$600.00

Color photograph
Year: 1992
Signed, numbered, dated and titled by hand
Edition: 12 + III
Condition: in mint condition
Size: 11.9 × 16.2 inches

1 in stock

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SKU: 92-1311 Categories: ,

Thomas Florschuetz (German, born 1960) recently emigrated from East Germany, and now lives in West Berlin. He made his first photographic self-portraits in 1982, and only last year began incorporating color into his work. In his earlier multipaneled [sic] black-and-white pieces, photographs of body parts are arranged in jarring relationships evocative of Neo-Expressionist art. Thomas Florschutz continues to use himself as the model in the new works, but here his presence is reduced to fragments of his hand and face, which are integrated into oversized organic anatomies that challenge the limitations of the term “portraiture.” Thomas Florschütz deliberately selects artificial hues for the backgrounds of his images, shifting the delicate color scale of the skin tones in each photograph. By photographically altering the size and color of his own body, Florschuetz creates forms that range from chaotic to classical.

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Thomas Florschuetz (German, born 1960) recently emigrated from East Germany, and now lives in West Berlin. He made his first photographic self-portraits in 1982, and only last year began incorporating color into his work. In his earlier multipaneled [sic] black-and-white pieces, photographs of body parts are arranged in jarring relationships evocative of Neo-Expressionist art. Thomas Florschutz continues to use himself as the model in the new works, but here his presence is reduced to fragments of his hand and face, which are integrated into oversized organic anatomies that challenge the limitations of the term “portraiture.” Thomas Florschütz deliberately selects artificial hues for the backgrounds of his images, shifting the delicate color scale of the skin tones in each photograph. By photographically altering the size and color of his own body, Florschuetz creates forms that range from chaotic to classical.