$600.00

Marino Marini
Plate VII from “Tout pres de Marino”
Aquatint Etching on Arches paper
Year: 1971
Color Lithograph
Size: 10.25×7.25 on 22x15in
Edition: 95
Not individually signed (only colophon signed and numbered)
Published by Societe Internationale d’art XXE Siècle, Paris, France
Printed by Lacourière et Frélaut copperplate engraving works in Paris, France
COA provided
Ref.: 924802-1363

About: This etching is part of a suite of ten intaglios that were issued with the title “Tout Pres de Marino” (Everything Near to Marini). It included 3 etchings done in 1958 and 7 done in 1971. The suite was published in 1971 by XXe Siecle in Paris and Leon Amiel in New York. It was printed by Lacouriere and Frelaut, the text was printed by Frequet and Baudier.
The edition suites are numbered: 6 suites, marked HC, numbered A to F; 25 suites on Velin d’Arches, numbered XVI/XL to XL/XL; 75 suites on Velin d’Arches, numbered 1/95 to 75/95 and 20 suites hors commerce numbered 76/95 to 95/95. There are an additional 6 suites for collaborators, 3 on Japon nacré and 3 on Arches.

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Marino Marini (27 February 1901 – 6 August 1980) was an Italian sculptor, printer, painter and educator.

He participated in the ‘Twentieth-Century Italian Art’ show at the Museum of Modern Art in New York City in 1944. Curt Valentin began exhibiting Marini’s work at his Buchholz Gallery in New York in 1950, on which occasion the sculptor visited the city and met Jean Arp, Max Beckmann, Alexander Calder, Lyonel Feininger, and Jacques Lipchitz. On his return to Europe, he stopped in London, where the Hanover Gallery had organized a solo show of his work, and there met Henry Moore. In 1951 a Marini exhibition traveled from the Kestner-Gesellschaft Hannover to the Kunstverein in Hamburg and the Haus der Kunst of Munich. He was awarded the Grand Prize for Sculpture at the Venice Biennale in 1952 and the Feltrinelli Prize at the Accademia dei Lincei in Rome in 1954. One of his monumental sculptures was installed in The Hague in 1959.[5]

Retrospectives of Marini’s work took place at the Kunsthaus Zürich in 1962 and at the Palazzo Venezia in Rome in 1966. His paintings were exhibited for the first time at Toninelli Arte Moderna in Milan in 1963–64. In 1973 a permanent installation of his work opened at the Galleria d’Arte Moderna in Milan, and in 1978 a Marini show was presented at the National Museum of Modern Art in Tokyo.

There is a museum dedicated to his work in Florence in the former church of San Pancrazio. His work may also be found in museums such as the Civic Gallery of Modern Art in Milan, the Tate Collection, The Angel of the City at the Peggy Guggenheim Collection, Venice, the Norton Simon Museum, Museum de Fundatie and the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden in Washington, D.C.

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Marino Marini (27 February 1901 – 6 August 1980) was an Italian sculptor, printer, painter and educator.

He participated in the ‘Twentieth-Century Italian Art’ show at the Museum of Modern Art in New York City in 1944. Curt Valentin began exhibiting Marini’s work at his Buchholz Gallery in New York in 1950, on which occasion the sculptor visited the city and met Jean Arp, Max Beckmann, Alexander Calder, Lyonel Feininger, and Jacques Lipchitz. On his return to Europe, he stopped in London, where the Hanover Gallery had organized a solo show of his work, and there met Henry Moore. In 1951 a Marini exhibition traveled from the Kestner-Gesellschaft Hannover to the Kunstverein in Hamburg and the Haus der Kunst of Munich. He was awarded the Grand Prize for Sculpture at the Venice Biennale in 1952 and the Feltrinelli Prize at the Accademia dei Lincei in Rome in 1954. One of his monumental sculptures was installed in The Hague in 1959.[5]

Retrospectives of Marini’s work took place at the Kunsthaus Zürich in 1962 and at the Palazzo Venezia in Rome in 1966. His paintings were exhibited for the first time at Toninelli Arte Moderna in Milan in 1963–64. In 1973 a permanent installation of his work opened at the Galleria d’Arte Moderna in Milan, and in 1978 a Marini show was presented at the National Museum of Modern Art in Tokyo.

There is a museum dedicated to his work in Florence in the former church of San Pancrazio. His work may also be found in museums such as the Civic Gallery of Modern Art in Milan, the Tate Collection, The Angel of the City at the Peggy Guggenheim Collection, Venice, the Norton Simon Museum, Museum de Fundatie and the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden in Washington, D.C.