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Grace Khalsa
Cobra
Medium: Black stoneware and white slip
Year: 2021
Size: 9′ x 11″ x 11.5″
Description: Slip-trailed skeleton sculpture
Signed
COA provided (by representing gallery)

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SKU: 924802-431 Categories: ,

“We humans are poised between microcosm and macrocosm, containing one, sensing the other, comprehending both.” – Frank Wilczek
The focus of my work is to bring attention to natural forms and patterns that implicate vast interconnection. I am captivated by the diversity and intricacy of natural systems and I consistently find myself searching for commonalities within them. These commonalities provide me with a tangible form of navigating the intangible perceptions of existence. My most recent body of work examines and illustrates the skeletons of various animals. In looking closely at their anatomy, I find undeniable similarities indicating common evolution. Shared spines, ribs, teeth and vestigial structures are the signatures of millions of years of complex relationships. After sculpting the body of the animal, I then meticulously slip-trail each skeletal detail layer by layer. This process requires an understanding of how every layer, however small, will affect the greater whole. I see clay as a material of ‘deep time’ both in a geological and cultural sense. Fired clay, ceramic, is an archival material, a record keeper of human history. Taking the role of a scientific illustrator, these works are my mark in time, paying homage to the creatures they portray. I hope to highlight the pervasive entanglement of life and honor the delicate, nuanced relationships that exist between human and non-human.

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Other Artwork by Grace Khalsa

Description

“We humans are poised between microcosm and macrocosm, containing one, sensing the other, comprehending both.” – Frank Wilczek
The focus of my work is to bring attention to natural forms and patterns that implicate vast interconnection. I am captivated by the diversity and intricacy of natural systems and I consistently find myself searching for commonalities within them. These commonalities provide me with a tangible form of navigating the intangible perceptions of existence. My most recent body of work examines and illustrates the skeletons of various animals. In looking closely at their anatomy, I find undeniable similarities indicating common evolution. Shared spines, ribs, teeth and vestigial structures are the signatures of millions of years of complex relationships. After sculpting the body of the animal, I then meticulously slip-trail each skeletal detail layer by layer. This process requires an understanding of how every layer, however small, will affect the greater whole. I see clay as a material of ‘deep time’ both in a geological and cultural sense. Fired clay, ceramic, is an archival material, a record keeper of human history. Taking the role of a scientific illustrator, these works are my mark in time, paying homage to the creatures they portray. I hope to highlight the pervasive entanglement of life and honor the delicate, nuanced relationships that exist between human and non-human.